Thursday, April 6, 2017

ahem: T13



1. peak means a mountain peak or pointy top (as in a hat with a peak):
pique means annoyance
peek means to look, ("i took a quick peek at the first page")

2. 'role model" not "roll model" unless you are built like a muffin
and are looking for work as a bakery item

3. "I don't know, right?"  Or the abbreviated IDK?  what does this MEAN

4.  I saw someone online the other day saying he was going out to get desert.  Amazing the difference when you drop a letter or two.  You  can eat IN the desert (and dessert if you want to) and you can desert your dessert in the desert, but anyone bringing home a desert for a snack needs a really large U-Haul truck.

5. "witnesses arrived to the scene..."   I've begun seeing this more and more, and it makes
me jump every time.  You can go to something,  or arrive at  but you never "arrive to"...  Yet. Unless, in your travels, you "arrive to join the party"

6. mussel is a particularly shaped clam,  muscle is er, a muscle. not the same thing, please.   After reading a very detailed blog about the 'muscles" along the river's edge I just plain lost interest,  sadly. It's a shame when one word can kill an entire blog.  Once is a typo.  Twice is not.

7. a lot means a whole bunch. "alot"  means youre not paying atention. =)

8.  "back in the day".  I have been hearing this for years, by people who are articulate, well read, all kinds of things.  I know what it means, by why is it necessary?

9.  When in  doubt, don't  throw an apostrophe at it.  The possessive "s" is always a mystery, even to me. I have been known to march clean around the barn just to avoid the front door with the Possessive S on it.  But there are time's when you do have to wonder ju's't why anyone doe's this'.    Stop it.

10. If you don't know, look it up. There really is no excuse (and this is where Spell check DOES help) for some words--Caesar is always spelled this way, no matter how much we don't want to believe it. Rogue is not a synonym for Rouge. Trust me.  Nor is Tounge an alternate spelling for anything.

11.  "Always" is never spelled "allways".  All ways is never one word.

12. "alright" is not a word.  "all right" is.

13.  The man who invented Dunkin' Donuts (may he rest in a soggy grave for this) changed forever the way we spell doughnut, in the same way that Stephen King gave credence to 'cemetary" (if he spelled it that way it must be right, right?   Noooo.)

Thursday Thirteen

17 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I've spelt 'alright' that way for years, until somone reminded me that it didn't exist. Funny how that stuff just slides past us.
      The one that really annoys me is "rogue" and "rouge": I play a Rogue in Worlds of Warcraft, and even when you correct people, they still call it "rouge". Spell check is not their friend, at that point.

      I think Spellcheck has done more to foster bad spelling ("well, I checked it in Spell check and THEY said it was okay...") than anything else.

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  2. Ha! Good points. You've given me a lot to ponder. Thanks.

    http://otherworlddiner.blogspot.com/2017/04/thirteen-pictures-from-new-berlin.html

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    1. Not to mention, "well, you knew what I meant..." as if that excuses everything.

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    2. I don't know, that phrase is usually said with a bit of wistfulness in the voice, is it not? Lovely list.

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    3. when I read it online there is less wist and a LOT of snark in it. The feeling implied, this is the way I spell, get over it.

      Coming from ten year olds, wistful,yeah. Coming from grown people, the snark is uppermost. =)

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  3. THANK YOU! These homonym mistakes make me crazy! The hail storm of apostrophes too! Especially when people just put an apostrophe at the end of a last name that ends in "S." Come on, people!

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    1. and then there are the ultra cautious (like people who always double knot their shoelaces) who take no chances' and will 'stick an apo'strophe anywhere they s'ee an 's', jus't in ca'se.

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  4. "Alright" is listed in my two-volume "Shorter Oxford" as being a legitimate adjective, adverb & noun. It says, "see ALL RIGHT." Language changes, even for us old grouchy grammarians.

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    1. interesting, and thank you. There was also a time when ain't was considered a nornmal and acceptable part of speech, too.
      And I will admit that double or triple negatives are kinda fun, "it don't matter none to me"...

      another one I noticed some time ago, is 'judgement' has become less and less popular, over 'judgment' although both can be used. sigh.

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  5. Judy, Judy, Judy. Relax; its prolly gonna be alright.

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    1. That was a classically awful sentence. I hope you didn't hurt anything there. You rouge, you

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  6. Well, I have mental blocks against some of these rules, but #4 made me laugh, a good line for stand-up.

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    1. Glad I made you laugh, Colleen. Feel free to borrow it, any time.

      I think unless we were whizzes' in s'chool, the possessive s and all it's cousins never really settle into a coherent pattern and I spend half my time trying to figure out why this word requires a plain old plural and that one insists on a possessive. Most times I just rewrite the sentence.

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  7. Speaking as a founding memers of the Pedants' Revolt, I have dumped more than one blog where the writer used "would of". How do they think this comes about? How? How? Sobs as she trails off in the distance, adjusting her pedant's cloak.

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    1. yep, fingernails on the blackboard of life, right there.

      I think I have a clue (oh gloriosky, a clue) as to how this happens. "would have' and "could have" can be used as 'would've' and 'could've' and when you say them out loud it sounds like would of and could of and pretty soon that's the way Pet Cemetary became part of the English language.
      Use bad construction long enough and suddenly it's acceptable (and yes i had to look that up twice)...

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  8. Lol, the possessive "S" is always a mystery to me as well. It used to be "their" and "there." I finally figured that one out in high school, (I think.)

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