Friday, March 3, 2017

The winter of our annoyance


I never quite understood the fascination with winter, with snow, with sub zero temps.   People actually CHOOSE to live here in Northern New England,  even if there's a choice for a balmier climate.  You know, Tennessee. Virginia.

Someone suggested to me that we did seem to obsess about wood.  As I recall, I pointed out that when you burn the stuff for close to nine months,  spend the other three or four or five cutting, splitting, stacking, and negotiating over it with wood deliverers,  it tends to crop up in convo quite frequently:

"get your wood in yet?"
"Nahh, threw my back out last week,  hard to throw wood leanin' on a cane, yep"

"How much you burn last winter, anyway?"
"Considering the early cold and the late snow,  just about everything back to the walls.  Mebbe 13 cords, mebbe less."
"Ouch."
"Yep, now I have to it do it all over again this year..."

Possibly, too, because burning wood is such a personal experience, I mean, you're right there with it, every step of the way--if you have gas or oil the delivery truck pulls up regularly, fills the tanks  and drives away.  Your only concern is finding the checkbook. After that, it's thermostat time.

But I seriously wonder why people, when they have the chance,  move NORTH instead of South...and then are surprised, open-mouth awestruck, when they look out the window one morning to see two feet of snow.  Like, it never happened before or something...

But there are perks to all of this. One of them is watching newcomers learn how to drive sideways on icy roads.

Or explaining why the 6" of new snow doesn't just disappear in a day or two "like it does in Tennessee..."

Or showing them what a roof rake is and why you really do need to clean off that roof NOW...

I know a man who buys a new plastic shovel every time it snows, because he always forgets and puts his used shovel away once he's cleaned the driveway.  In the shed.  The one where the snow drifts in and plugs the door shut.

14 comments:

  1. New England is beautiful and a lovely place to live - in the summer.

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  2. spring is glorious, as is summer--and autumn is bittersweet and equally lovely. I always consider winter the price we pay for the other three seasons, and spring, especially, is the reward for not going starkers after the third blizzard in two weeks. In March.

    I've always thought Washington state, or Oregon, seemed like such sensible places. Nice climate, not too much hysterical weather, lotta green. I've put my name in for the next time around.

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  3. i'd take Winter over Summer most days. you can pile on the layers as needed, but there is no wardrobe fix for hot and sweaty.

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    1. That's just it. all those layers, and it's never the right combination. I was never a fan of cold anyway, it always seems an insult to the internal fires in some way.

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  4. Wait...it snows where you are?

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    1. Now and then, Mr. L. This time of year more now than then, apparently. There is a white thin blanket of snow right now, trying to cover up what's left of our outside wood.
      The wind has whipped itself into an hysterical frenzy, attempting to make a 1/2" of snow into drifts. I won't mention the -5 degrees this morning at dawn.

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  5. I got that qu about shoveling snow recently, friend in pnw. I explained about law, and repeat freezing then snowing, etc. She thought we could just wait till it melted. Like Seattle. Now she knows and is reconciled to her endless rain. To which she's welcome.

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    1. I must admit right now that endless rain begins to sound mighty appealing...

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  6. Sounds like you might not have spent much time in England, where if it's not pouring, just raining, it's considered a nice day. Such a relief to live here where it might rain, but then it will stop.

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    1. Oh, understood, Liz. Too much of anything is just too much, whether it's rain or fog or temperament or that really good chocolate cake...


      Then again there's really no such thing as too much chocolate cake, is there.

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  7. For me, a choc disliker, actually yes. One piece is too much. But that's fine for the person next to me who gets my share. So it's all good.

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    1. Then you sit next to me at the next Cake Serving event. Yes please. =)

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  8. But it's so pretty...!

    Loved this new way - to me - of looking at snow. And the man who must have a shed full of shovels by now :)

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    1. It is pretty, Tilly. I have zillions of photos to prove it. Before digital cameras the joke was, use black and white film, why waste the expensive stuff on it?
      I can appreciate it as it falls, blows, drifts, redrifts, melts. But after four months of that you begin to lose your enthusiasm. By May you are so ready for green anything it's scary.
      The man who invented the roof rake (which is exactly what it is) has probably retired on the profits and lives in Florida now.

      I suspect we feel about snow the way you feel about rain. A little is nice, saves you from watering the garden--but anything more is wayyyyy too much.

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