Saturday, August 27, 2016

At the Far End Of Summer (6WS)

Already the days are noticeably shorter and no matter the daytime temperature, the nights cool down rapidly.  By morning  one of us has pulled up the extra blanket.  Soon it will be too chilly for open windows.

Happens every year, and every year I'm always surprised at how it got here so fast.  It's all relative, of course, and as we age our sense of time and distance shifts noticeably. I wonder where the breakeven point would be?  If we lived to be 200 would time whip past us like a speeding train, or just settle down to a regular steady wind blowing in from the planets...

And after all, it's where you're standing on the platform  when the train pulls into the station, isnt it.

Where is Einstein when you need him.




13 comments:

  1. My Beloved Sandra and I have already started the (twice yearly) battle of wills regarding the windows open/closed, comforter at knee or chin level.

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    1. I have mine trained. He grew up in a house (this one, actually) where the winds blew chlly across the plains, the hills, and the windowsills. He's learned to love blankets.
      This house is airy enough without opening a window in midwinter, anyway...

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  2. Open windows are rather enjoyable.

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    1. Mlissabeth, I love open windows, even more I love the idea of the entire sash being gone so there is nothing between me and the outdoors but a serious leap--but this being new england, at some point you need to put the windows back in, or down, and wait for spring...

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  3. Welcome back, I was fearing you had left us. Time does fly when we no longer have to hold down a miserable job

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  4. This is true, and thank you for your concern. Just been busy with stuff and feeling a bit written out, I guess. it does happen.

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  5. I read with amazement that the nights are cooler..living for that, and not expecting it any time soon in this hot and humid place. Lovely when you can open windows and put a blanket on the bed..

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  6. Well we do live a tad north of you, Liz, and about 1100 feet above sea level. It makes a huge difference this time of year.

    I'm always suprised (and shouldn't be by now) at the noticeable difference in bloom times between here and downtown, sometimes a week or two between our flowers and theirs.

    So I guess you're having late summer, and we are having early fall. The best, as they say, is yet to come. =)

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  7. The elevation is an issue! We're about 20 feet above sea level, give or take a foot. And with a massive network of waterways supplying all the humidity a person might need.

    The hummingbird visited again today when I thought she might have left already.

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  8. Actual elevation is 26 metres. Slightly more than I estimated. I guess we're in the mountains..

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  9. Our hummers are still around too. As long as there are flowers they can feed on, I suspect they don't give up on us. Aggressive little things, though; we had a mating pair nesting somewhere in the folds of the huge old maple in our yard, and they would drive off any bird that got within yards of them.

    Piffle, you are definitely in the hill country, safe from anything but maybe a Tsunami. We have the humidity, just not the rain this summer. The small amount we've been getting never gets more than a few inches into the ground, and the trees are literally wilting.

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  10. It is not cooling down here, but the days are shorter. I was coming home last night about 8 pm and the night sky was already in place. It made me sad.

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  11. Yep, I try not to look at how short the days are getting.

    The cats insist that Out means Out until we can catch them, maybe 10:30 now. Had to carry one of them in last night, protesting, like a four year old kid, that he wasnt sleeeepy yet...
    They seem to take turns staying out late, so while I can usually get one, it's never the same One the next night. If it wasnt for the fishercats and the coyotes I'd not worry, neither of them stray far, but wild things come right into the yard, so...

    By mid October I'll have to face the fact that golly, it's getting dark out earlier now. But not yet.

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