Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Garden in the fog

still life with cart


elderberry bushes

the first poppy, purple alium,  solomon's seal

lol everything looks more intriguing in the fog


12 comments:

  1. Lovely series of images. Thank you.

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    1. all that green. it just overwhelms sometimes, doesnt it. And always, up here, we have a forest for a background, which often seems like an anomaly for a slightly shaggy semi formal garden...

      they say that the early farmers painted their houses and barns red to counterbalance (unconsciously, I'm sure) the visual fatigue you get when you stare at one color too long--in this case, green, green, my god green...and red is the exact opposite on the color wheel.

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  2. I thought the red was milk and blood mixture paint. Totally weatherproof, cheap at slaughtering time etc.

    Just a thought, possibly wrong!

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    1. not that I ever heard, but it was usually, at least way back, milk paint, not sure what the coloring agent was but it surely did penetrate. It was more a stain than a true paint as we know it. In reading about it, it seems to have consisted of milk, lime, and whatever pigment was available, possiby iron oxides which I think are sturdy, color wise, and gave it that deep reddish brown hue.

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  3. More research says you're right. Evidently the oil stain usually linseed, sealed the wood, and the added iron oxide,rust, acted with it as a fungicide and pesticide, protecting the contents. Also cheap, a big point. The fact that it ended up red wasn't a goal, just a side effect. A nice one.

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  4. I suspect the reasoning, while sound and accurate, was more by luck and by golly than anything else. Farmers and land owners took what they could get/find/make.

    This house is 200+ years old, no idea what color the outside was originally, but in the dining room the original paint was a strange shade of greeny grey on the molding with a thin accent border of what can only be called dark peacock blue. The door leading to the front hall is a violent shade of bright blue.

    Irremovably blue. lol.

    Color was important to people then, they had so little of it in their lives, so I imagine they gaudied up the house as best they could. Wallpaper was for the wealthy, and most people had bare white plaster walls, whitewashed. Small wonder they went for the throat when it came to color on the woodwork.

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  5. I remember my parents stippling our plaster walls, old house. Wallpaper too expensive and house too damp for it. Haven't thought of that for years. Thanks for the jaunt down memory lane.

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  6. At that period though, 1940s, for woodwork scumbling was the order of the day, skilful faux graining using a feather to simulate various woods

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    1. actually that sounds rather pretty, if tricky. I dont know as that Ive ever seen it, (which doesnt mean it isnt around just that I never saw it) but Id imagine done well it could be extremely interesting...

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  7. We have doors that were varnished and then a comb or crumpled paper was used to make a grainy pattern in the varnish. Underneath that was the old red paint. Looking at the very worn woodwork in here, most of it was originally that greeny grey, and looks like milk paint, of which I suspect they had barrels, and used it on everything from wood work to furniture.

    Our fireplace mantles/mantels and surrounds, true to the culture, were all painted black in the late 1860s as mourning for Lincoln when he was assassinated. It's a great way to date a house.

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  8. This is fascinating stuff. Any chance of pix if that wouldn't interfere with your privacy?

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  9. oh sure. I can post them in here or just send 'em to you. The black fireplace surrounds are now scraped down to the bare pine, much prettier, to my mind, but the doors I've refrained from painting over.
    The fireplace mantels have been painted and repainted so often the lovely carving in them was just about obscured. Lemme see what I can come up with.

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