Saturday, October 5, 2013

Never Count The Old Tree Out (6WS)

apple trees are notorious for living apparently forever.  This one is (possibly) a  Gravenstein,  a very old very good species.   For the past decade or so we've watched this tree, which had a massive trunk,  slowly get more and more brittle, limbs came off, it looked dead.
Let's wait a bit, I said.   Put away the chain saw ("but.. but...we can use the wood.  it's DEAD")  and give it some time.

This year the few puny branches, like wisps of hair on an old man's head,  became serious foliage.


and on one side:

if you look really closely you can see apples and even the parts that look as if they could be cut off with a pair of scissors now have living branches.  Just 'cause it's old, doesn't mean it's not got value. 







12 comments:

  1. I am so glad you stood up for this brave tree! And he's really grateful too, giving you apples. Such a nice post.

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  2. "Just 'cause it's old, doesn't mean it's not got value."

    Thanks, JT.

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  3. I must be a tree because it sounded like you were talking about me.

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  4. Faith definitely has its virtues . . . :-)

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  5. celebrating with you your apple tree and wishing you a happy Saturday

    much love...

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  6. I'm "up to here" in apples! The neighbour has a huge one which overshadows our garden and she doesn't like apples. I keep getting a knock on the door and another bagfull :) I do like a crumble, don't you?

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  7. Never ever, not me, I love all trees, and I see it's fruit!

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  8. this has been a banner year for apple trees here in NH, at least, and all kinds of fruit trees. Ours are usually poor things, gnurly and wormy, and between the deer the tuirkeys and the porcupines there are full bellies everywhere.
    We dont spray anything, but now and then we get a year with clean fruit, and that's when the apple recipes come out in full force. This year we had abundance if not quality.

    (f you click on either picture it will take you to a light box (now and then Google gets this stuff right) where you can view any photo at a much higher resolution.)

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  9. This year has been amazing for apple trees in central NJ, too, in fact for practically all the fruit at my local farm. Cold wet spring but NO late frost. The variable weather has been hard on farmers trying to plan, for the CSA, but wonderful for their customers, since all the produce has been just great.

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  10. Lovely post! And I can so follow you for wanting to save the tree and give it another chance. And it rewarded your patience! I love apple trees. And your last line: beautiful!!

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  11. The apple trees here were loaded, all of them accidentals, meaning no one planted them, and they don't get sprayed. Its a wide variety, from early yellows to late fall reds. Trees I've never seen with anything but poor small fruit are just laden. Happy happy deer. Turkeys. Porcupines.

    Cessie, thank you. Im sure if we had cut it back to the ground it would have resprouted (they do that too) but its been in the corner of that field for lord alone knows hoiw long, it bothers no one, so why fuss with it?

    And in thinking about it, this is probably the third incarnation--there is a hollow stumpy thing next to this that was obviously the first tree--the second one is dying, but it has put out shoots and foliage, saving itself again. Go, tree.

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