Wednesday, September 9, 2009

License

25 years ago in November I got my first driver's license, (can we say late bloomer here), and today I went for my new one, (we now get them every five years instead of three), with a new photo id. my god. I now resemble an aging and slightly melted Lily Tomlin. We even took two tries at it, but i could see things weren't improving with practice, so I let it go and took the second one.

From there we went north to the Flume Gorge, which I havent seen since I was a kid. Damned impressive, and not a bad walk at all.





10 comments:

  1. You don't seem melted to me, lady. Flume-ish, maybe. Gorge-ish.

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  2. well you be prejud-ish, but thank you. Then again you know what DMV photos and passport photos do to a person...aha I know why they're so bad--if you know you will have to show that awful thing to a cop who just stopped you for speeding, you can be sure you will drive more slowly, gracefully, and wear that seatbelt all the time. anything to have to show him that photo.

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  3. {anything other than to have to show him that photo..) sheesh learn to proofreed, mittens...

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  4. What a beautiful place, I love places like that. Now how about a pic of that drivers license?

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  5. it's about a mile round trip, all of it through a narrow gorge that is often no more than 8 feet wide. At the top you have an option to take a longer route which will lead you up onto Mt. Flume (funny I never knew there was a Mt. Flume, I thought it might have been a geological term), but we opted for the shorter route.

    It's a lovely place, indeed, and best visited early in the day before the tour buses arrive...

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  6. Does the planked walkway rise like a floating dock in a hard rain? It's lovely.

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  7. oh, Cindy, I surely hope not.

    It's a marvel of engineering, when you consider most of what's constructed is either bolted into the rock on the side or anchored deep into bedrock below. That water that flows past is, even at this dry weather stage, nothing I'd want to deal with, one on one, it's very fast moving. I suspect if it rises after the spring snow melts it just inundates the bridges in some spots.

    I think floating bridges might be more than most people would care to think about in there. Oh, Im seeing it now, dozens of middle aged people, bobbing up and down like corks, an interesting shade of green, riding out the waves...

    It's a pretty narrow gorge, so any water that goes through there is really traveling. They warn people to stay out of the water, stay on the bridges.

    But I do rather like the concept...

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  8. If you click on that picture (those pictures actually) you can see them full size, and much more clearly...

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  9. Oh! I hadn't clicked on the picture! Extra cool! I wouldn't want to get caught in there in a heavy rain either...

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  10. nope, me neither. If only because there's just no shelter...and those walkways do get slippery.

    any of the photos in here in the main body of the blog are clickable, some are bigger than others, depending on which camera I used and how much I shrunk 'em down.

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